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Criminal Defense Attorney for Domestic Violence Cases in Northwest Arkansas

Facing domestic violence charges in Arkansas is an extremely serious matter. With more than a decade of legal experience, attorney Mike Armstrong provides aggressive representation for individuals accused of domestic violence in Bentonville, AR, Rogers, AR, Fayetteville, AR, Springdale, AR, and all of Benton County and Washington County.

If you are facing domestic charges in Arkansas, the first step toward protecting yourself is understanding what is at risk. At a minimum, you are facing up to a year in jail. For a first-degree offense, you could be looking at as many as 30 years behind bars. Prosecutors in Arkansas vigorously pursue charges of domestic violence, and individuals who fail to seek experienced legal representation can easily find themselves facing severe criminal penalties with lifelong consequences.

Mike Armstrong, Managing Attorney of Armstrong Law in Bentonville, AR, is an honest and aggressive trial lawyer who brings more than 10 years’ experience to the table. He regularly represents clients charged with serious criminal offenses, and he relies on his extensive criminal law background to develop sound strategies for protecting his clients’ rights. If you have been charged with domestic violence, you will need an experienced and committed attorney like Mike Armstrong on your side for the best possible defense.

First, Second and Third-Degree Domestic Battering

In Arkansas, the crime of domestic violence is officially called “domestic battering.” There are three degrees of domestic battering charges, each with its own unique elements and penalties:

First-Degree Domestic Battering

In most cases, first-degree domestic battering is a Class B felony, which carries a potential 20-year prison sentence. But, if either (i) you were convicted of domestic battering within the past five years, or (ii) the prosecution proves that you knew or should have known that the victim was pregnant, you could face 30 years in prison for a Class A felony.

Second-Degree Domestic Battering

Second-degree battering is typically a Class C felony, carrying a maximum prison sentence of 10 years. However, a second-degree offense can become a Class B felony under the circumstances described above for a first-degree Class A felony.

Third-Degree Domestic Battering

A third-degree domestic battering charge is a Class A misdemeanor, which carries the potential for up to a year in jail. However, a third-degree offense can become a Class D felony under the same circumstances described above.

Assault on a family or household member

Assault on a family or household member is a lesser charge of domestic violence. Someone can be charged with this crime if they have acted in such a way that they risked harm, serious injury or death to a family or household member, or that they made a family or household member afraid of being injured, harmed or killed.

First Degree Assault on a Family or Household Member

A first degree assault charge where the victim is a family or household member is a Class A Misdemeanor, which carries a potential punishment of up to a year in jail, and can occur when a person behaves in a way that creates a substantial risk of death or serious injury to another person.

Second Degree Assault on a Family or Household Member

A second degree assault charge where the victim is a family or household member is a Class B Misdemeanor, which carries a potential punishment of up to six months in jail, and can occur when a person behaves in a way that creates a substantial risk of injury to another person.

Third Degree Assault on a Family or Household Member

A third degree assault charge where the victim is a family or household member is a Class C Misdemeanor, which carries a potential punishment of up to ninety days in jail, and can occur when a person creates apprehension or fear of harm in another person.

Aggravated Assault on a Family or Household Member

An aggravated assault charge where the victim is a family or household member is a Class D Felony, which carries a potential punishment of up to six year in prison, and it can occur when someone takes some action that risks serious bodily injury or death to others, where they use a deadly weapon to threaten someone else, or when they restrict the airway of someone else.

Key Facts about Facing Domestic Violence Charges in Arkansas

Domestic violence cases are never straightforward. If you have been charged with domestic battering, there is much more to your situation than meets the eye, and you need to be aware of what is fact and what is common misconception. When you sit down with Mike for your free initial consultation, he will explain everything you need to know about your case, including:

  • Your charges will not be dropped just because the alleged victim recants, changes their story, or simply doesn’t want you prosecuted. Contrary to popular belief, if your alleged victim recants or changes his or her story, or if they simply don’t want you punished or prosecuted for the alleged crime, the prosecution can still pursue its case against you.
  • You can lose your gun rights for a domestic violence conviction. Under federal law, you can lose your right to carry a firearm - potentially, for the rest of your life - if you get convicted of domestic battering.
  • You may have several defenses available. Regardless of the circumstances at hand, you may have several defenses available. From false accusations to police misconduct, Mike will explore all possible grounds to have your charges reduced or your case dismissed.

Schedule a Free Initial Consultation with Attorney Mike Armstrong

For more information about your Arkansas domestic battering case, contact Armstrong Law to schedule a free initial consultation. To speak with Mike in confidence, call (479) 268-4190 or request an appointment online now.